Irish origins in the Caribbean

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Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby rododon » Thu Dec 14, 2017 1:16 pm

Do you have an Irish name? Do you know how your family got it? If you do, what does your Irish heritage mean to you? Do you know on which islands your family lived in the past?

Secondarily, do you know any Caribbean folktales about Irish-named people?

I have done a lot of research on my own surname (and its variants) and the Irish in general in the Caribbean.

If you are not sure if your name is of Irish origin please ask me. I will endeavour to answer any questions people may have on the Irish influence on Caribbean history and life, and I hope to learn a lot of new stuff myself.

Looking forward to hearing from anyone interested in this subject

Thanks

Rod O'Donoghue
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby caribbeanton15 » Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:22 pm

I learned that Montserrat has a connection to the Irish. My great grandfather was from Montserrat and carried the surname Browne. Does that surname have any Irish origin?
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Mariposa » Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:03 pm

Hey,

I have more than a few ancestors who are descendants from Ireland via the States or the Caribbean. The most interesting story yet is about the Card family that I'm related to. They come from Rhode Island, which to me was random because I didn't think I had family in the States back then. They were indentured servants who came on a boat from a war then were freed in the States after working.

Anyway, these Card brothers became merchants in Black River, Honduras alongside men who signed Burnaby's Code... which is considered the first constitution of the Americas. They had kids with slaves that they freed. They lived and worked with the Miskitu Kingdom, and fought the Spanish alongside the kingdom all the time. One brother died. At some point they were pushed up to Belize because of war, and that's where my folks come from.

Surnames related to me are Card, Meighan, McDonald, and Morrison. I apologize, some of these names are not necessarily Irish, but Scottish. Overall UK though! I'm sure there are more, but I'm slowly finding all this information. For example, I know I have a lot of relatives in Roatan, Honduras. Utila for example was full of Irish folk. Or so I've heard...

Any stories you know of the Mosquito coast, Cayman Islands, Roatan, or even Belize would be greatly appreciated. I'm sure some of my ancestry also began in Jamaica. That's was a central point for slaves, merchants, and everything else.

Thanks :)
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby TriniJan » Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:31 pm

Hi Rod, we're descended from a (William) Lynch, who migrated to Barbados in the later 1800's. He settled in St. Michael's and married a Dorothy Briggs. His daughter, my great-grandmother, then migrated to Trinidad. Even though she had three brothers, none of their descendants survived so the Trini branch is the only one left of him in the Caribbean. Interestingly, we have coins and jewelry and documents that he brought with him from Ireland.
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Borrome » Thu Dec 14, 2017 6:22 pm

Surnames: Borrome, Bridgwater.
Regards,
Ramos Martinez
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby chickensharon » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:29 pm

Hi, my grand father left Barbados just before WW1 to emigrate to Canada. His name was Edward Ellison Martin Harris, his father was Edward Ellison Harris and his mother was Agnes Harris, nee Martin. There are also family names of Weekes, some of these seem to be Scottish in origin.
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Amber » Fri Dec 15, 2017 2:40 am

Surname: McDermott
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Riley » Fri Dec 15, 2017 10:47 am

Good day,

I am currently researching my Hovell , Riley, Prescott , and Kipps ancestry.
For the Hovell surname in particular, family tales that have passed down through the generations suggest that the Hovells in Trinidad and Tobago are of Scottish descent. However, because I have reached a wall in my research :cry: I am willing to explore the possibility that they might have been of Irish origin. Hope you can assist. Also looking for information on the Prescotts, Rileys and Kipps as well.

Regards,
Riley.
Last edited by Riley on Sun Dec 17, 2017 1:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Hugh Constable » Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:19 pm

Hi Rod
Although my surname is generally regarded as being English rather than Irish, I have reason to believe that my ancestors moved to Ireland in the late 1600s, and that they were merchants in Dublin. I think that two of the sons (William and Henry Constable) were then sent out to Dominica around 1765, probably to front the Caribbean end of the business. What has always intrigued me is "Of all the islands, why Dominica?" Was there a significant Irish population in Dominica at the time? Any info you have would be welcome.

Regards
Hugh Constable
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby neil.spurgeon » Fri Dec 15, 2017 2:52 pm

Hi there Hugh

I am not sure if it is relevant but my 3rd Great Grandfather, Thomas Hill who was born in Westmoreland, Jamaica in 1793 the son of a Shropshire gentleman (and plantation owner who was both a Magistrate and a Captain of Artillery in the Jamaican Militia), served in the Royal Navy but after Waterloo, when the Navy was run down, he became a Coastguard Chief Officer on a number of Irish stations, ending his life in 1840 in Donaghadee, close to Bangor, County Down. I suspect that his family remained in Ireland thereafter although obviously Hill is a rather common surname to track over time.

Regards

Neil Spurgeon
Neil Spurgeon
Researching Hill in Jamica & Ireland, Spurgeon in Essex; Farley in Kent; any help gratefully received
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby rododon » Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:16 pm

Such a lot to reply to. I will work my way through.

caribbeanton 15
Montserrat has probably the deepest Irish influence with largest number of early Irish governors. Irish folk finished up there after being kicked out of St Kitts.

Browne is an Irish name derived from de Brun, an Anglo-Norman family. They settled in a number of places but the most eminent were form Killarney in Co.Kerry. The name is also found in England of course

Mariposa
Card (Cart), Meighan(Meehan), McDonald(McDonnell), and Morrison might all be found in Ireland. But as you say also elsewhere.
I know very little about the Irish in Central America so you may be able to teach me. I recognise that a lot of Caribbean labour went to work in Panama in the 19th C. and could have migrated from there. Let's start with Utila, what more do you know?

triniJan
What did William do as an occupation? There is a strong Irish heritage in Trinidad. What sort of documents do you have from Ireland? Diversion - I was in a restaurant at the top of the Blue Mountains in Jamaica and heard an Irish voice. I was the only white person there. I tracked down the voice and spoke to him and his girlfriend. Turned out he was from Trinidad and had been educated in Dublin. Small world! There is an area on that road called Irishtown. Irish-based place names are all over the islands.

borrome
I am afraid I don't recognise either of those names as Irish. The closest is Boran or Burrane from the Gaelic O Bodhrain (like the drum). If you were a poor Irish person you would have spoken Gaelic and no one would have been able to spell your name correctly from your voice. For my surname there are over 500 different variant spellings across the world.

Enough for tonight - more over the weekend

Cheers all

Rod
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby msym » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:02 pm

I am very interested in one Irish person whom I believe was in the Caribbean. My relative's name was John Knox. We believe that he married Rachel Hanslep (daughter of Margaret Gordon and widow of Alexander Hanslep (died 1823) becoming co-owner of a platation in Retirement.

He appears to have had 4 children in Jamaica (around the St Ann area) and he left Rachel and returned to Ballymoney Ireland with the children. He married there and he and family moved to Adelaide in 1853. There was a diary entry of a person working on the ship Tancred in 1852 which referred to John Knox and his time in Jamaica
http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames ... knox/3282/

I am trying to find out who is the mother of his children? And my GGGgrandmother?

Mary
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby rododon » Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:25 pm

More responses

chickensharon
Harris is an English name found in Ireland in the north resulting from the Plantation of Ulster begun in the 17th century by King James I

Amber
McDermott is Mac Diarmada found in the west in the province of Connaght

Riley
Prescott can be Irish, first recorded in Meath in 15th century, in Kilkenny in 17th . Now mainly found in Dublin and Belfast. Riley or Reilly is clearly Irish from Ó Rathailligh and centred on County Cavan. Hovell and Kipps not recognisable to me.

Hugh Constable
Constable is not a name I recognise as Irish, none of my books have it in. Presumably they were running a trading arm of an English business in Dublin. Dominica is one of the few Caribbean islands that I have not visited. Britain took over the island from the French in 1763 so it makes sense that British commercial interests had a go. Am not aware of any particular Irish connections other than the pirate connections in the 17th century of which there were many operating out of St Lucia, Tobago and Dominica.

msym
Knox is a Scottish name but is found in the north of Ireland from planted people. Ballymoney is in County Antrim so that fits. Can’t help with your genealogical research I’m afraid

Cheers

Rod
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby msym » Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:19 pm

thanks Rod for replying so quickly.

Mary
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Re: Irish origins in the Caribbean

Postby Rhodenoantof » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:00 pm

My family name (grandfather) is Mills said to be Irish from St Elizabeth. I don't know much about him and in turn he didn't know much or at least talk about his family (mother died young)
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